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Author Topic: new furret  (Read 2020 times)
regent969
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taz


« on: February 21, 2010, 09:44:19 PM »

i want to buy new furret but i like to know if i cant buy whit all the part because i have marshall furret and is very sick and my veto said it because i was operatate to young  is name is  taz and is cate 5 years know and i receive 2 shot of lupron every month since 1 years cant you help me
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Georgiesmom
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« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2010, 11:43:41 AM »

I am sorry to hear that your ferret is sick, have you considered a Deslorelin implant for Taz?

I am from UK where all ferrets are unfixed, they are not farmed as they are in North America. So you either get one from an owner who has a litter of kits, usually at 6-8 weeks or from an animal shelter.  They most certainly do not cost $400, $20 at  most.  I managed to negotiate a small, deformed, female called Wicket, from (imo) an unfit owner for the cost of a pint of hard cider.  The ferret was deformed because her mother had only been fed on bread and milk!!

Every ferret I owned came to me unfixed. I generally had them fixed at around 6 months.  Unfixed males become aggressive in the Spring; they scent mark (dragging their behinds over everything) and have a strong smell of musk (not an unpleasant smell to a devoted ferret lover).  Unfixed females can become extremely sick and eventually die if they are left in season. They too can become aggressive and protective over another ferret if they experience a phantom pregnancy.

Unfixed male ferrets are very muscular, with big jowls; the albinos have an orange tint to their coats which is quite oily.  Once neutered they lose their muscle tone and their coats become white and less oily, it happens very quickly after surgery.   
 
I have not noticed that my UK ferrets lived any longer or were any healthier then the ferrets I have since owned in Canada.  I also had a ferret, Weasel, who was a part of a breeding program at a zoo in UK.  Weasel was mixed European polecat, I expected him to make very old bones given his genetics but I lost him last year.  He too had become adrenal, and then succumbed to insulinoma, he didn't make 6 years old, and none of mine ever have. 
 
I know that here have been a lot of discussion about ferret illness and natural light, but my guys lived outdoors in a large enclosure and only came in the house for wrecking time.  The only difference I noticed was that they had phenomenal winter coats and that continued once we got to Canada even though they became indoor ferrets.

The argument that UK ferrets are healthier, I would dispute. There are not the ferret knowledgeable vets in UK, mainly because most ferrets are not lucky enough to make it to the vet's office for the chance to be diagnosed.

This is just my personal view and experience on unfixed ferrets and not the view of the Ferret Rescue.
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ferret_girl
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« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2010, 03:06:37 PM »

It is VERY unlikely that you will find an unaltered ferret anywhere in Canada. The majority of ferrets in Canada are farmed by Marshall's or Great Canadian and they alter their kits at about 6 weeks of age. If you are looking for an unaltered kit you will likely have to contact a breeder in the States, since I don't think there are any in Canada. If you do some research, you can find some reputable breeders but it is likely you will have to drive quite a ways out to get the ferret (since most reputable breeders will NOT ship their ferrets as it is quite dangerous to their health).

As for early neutering being linked to adrenal disease...I believe at this point it is still just speculation. There are many factors that contribute to adrenal disease including genetics. Therefore, even though you may neuter your ferret later in life, if he is not from good genes he may still develop adrenal disease later on in life...even still, there really is no guarantee.
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