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Author Topic: ECE  (Read 2710 times)
amanda23
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ECE
« on: September 09, 2009, 12:24:51 PM »

Hello Everyone,
I'm a new member living in Newfoundland and I wanted to take advantage of the Societies expertise. I have four ferrets of various ages (between 1 and 2 years old) and one of my little girls has come down with ECE. She (Dee) has the 'slimy' poop that is usually green although sometimes it's orange along with decreased appetite and she's been hiding in her play tube a lot. One of my males (Rupie) and the other female (Cee) have all had ECE before (one right after we got her from her foster home and one right out of the pet store). I've been isolating Dee from the rest since I noticed but I'm afraid I was too late and now our last male (Jay) looks like he is coming down with it.

They will both still eat as much soup (Chicken baby food, a bit of kibble, some 100% pumpkin for the runny poohs) as you can give them and they still haves some energy (Jay more than Dee). My question is this: At what point should we bring them to the vet? They are both eating enough and not losing weight. My two ferrets who already had ECE both recovered very quickly (in a few days) but I wasn't as ferret knowledgeable then). Vets that are ferret knowledgable are extremely rare in Newfoundland. If there is nothing that can be medically done for them then I'd rather just treat them at home.


So any advice you can give is appreciated and I'll keep everyone updated eitherway.

Cheers,
Amanda
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ferret_girl
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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2009, 01:23:45 PM »

The scary thing about ECE is that it can get out of hand very fast. I had one guy who had greeny slimy poop one day and the next he was flat...he wouldn't eat/ drink or play. If your ferrets are lethargic or are having to be force fed they should see a vet. I'm a worry wart owner so personally I would bring my guys in ASAP if I thought they had ECE, but I suppose if the ferrets are still acting fairly normal (eating, drinking, playing) keeping a close eye on them would be ok for the time being. Treatment of ECE is mainly supportive care such as IV fluids as ECE is a virus so there is no medicinal cure (like there would be with an infection)...just remember that ferrets can get really sick really fast so don't wait to get treatment if they start to decline in health or if the slimy poop persists.

Good Luck!
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Kalimata
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« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2009, 12:50:10 PM »

Fluid intake is the biggest problem with ECE fuzzies.  A good skill to have is knowing how to give subcutanious (SP) fluids, fluids just under the skin.  If your vet is open to the idea, ask him/her to teach you how to do it.  It's really quite easy to do, and it comes in so handy with sick fuzzies.  The best fluid for the is Baxter Plasmalite.  If your vet doesn't want you doing that, then force feeding water is the other option.

With ECE it's really a maintenance game.  Keeping the fuzzy fed and watered for the duration of the illness.  With us, the motto is "When in doubt, go to the vet".  Granted, the vet will probably just give the ferret sub-cue fluids, and maybe some Carnicare to keep up the strength.
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Ferrettaxi
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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2009, 08:56:43 PM »

Another thing that is helpful is Solcrate. It can be given up to three times a day and up to 1cc/ml per dose. It should be given at least 30min. before feedings.

During an ECE outbreak most ferrets will also be affected by stomach ulcers. You see them eat less, smack their teeth and there will eventually be weight loss. The Solcrate helps coat their tummies so they can eat. Just keep in mind that if their breath starts to smell bad, their gums get red and slimy and/or you can visibly see sores in the mouth, take them to the vet A.S.A.P. This is an indicator that the ferret isn't eating enough or drinking enough and is in trouble. At this point they will need sub-Q fluids and possibly IV fluids. You don't ever want them to get to this point.

If you keep up with the Solcrate and duck soup feedings, which are less aggressive on their stomachs compared to kibble, they should recover just fine

Good luck,
Jen
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amanda23
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« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2009, 06:50:48 AM »

Update:

After almost a week of constant feeding of soup and keeping a close eye on them I haven't seen any suspicious pooh in two days and both ferrets are eating kibble and drinking. I'm, still feeding soup once or twice a day as I'm not sure they're completly over it even if they don't have symptoms. I've never heard of ECE only lasting a few days. I may have been wrong about Jay as he only had one bad day and then was fine and gorged himself on soup. He's actually gained a bit of weight which is fine too. We're keeping an eye on things but I'm so relieved. They never did refuse the soup during thier illness so maybe they had a mild version of the virus? Anyway I will keep updating and hopefully we won't see a return of the Green Slime.

Thanks everyone for your advice!
Amanda
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